Rebecca DeGroot

Rebecca DeGroot is a high school art teacher from Houston, Texas.
A parttime maker, Rebecca spends the majority of her time creating sculpture, primarily using wood.
Rebecca also finds reward in working with clay.
Known for being an high school art teacher, Rebecca shares a passion for creating and wants to educate others about art and making.
Through her popular YouTube channel, Rebecca shares projects such as woodworking, designing, and making anything and everything that’s interesting.
Rebecca’s long-term ambition is to travel and demonstrate woodworking techniques.
Rebecca wishes her students not only to do something that makes them happy, but also to inspire others to be themselves and try their hardest at everything they do.
You can find Rebecca the most active on Facebook known as RebeccaDeGroot
You can also find her on Instagram known as Rebecca_DeGroot
Lastly, be sure to visit rebeccadegroot.com

Josh Price

Josh Price is a father, husband, teacher, maker, and content creator. Josh and his family sold their home and moved into an RV, with Josh’s shop occupying a small compartment near the back. He and his family are planning to travel around the United States, visiting different maker spaces and workshops so that Josh can open his own community workspace when the trip is over. Join us as we talk about:

  • The minimalism of putting a family of five in an RV
  • Putting a woodshop in a space the size of a closet
  • His journey as a Maker

 

“homeschool kids don’t have shop class, so I figured I could be that shop class.”

“according to tradition, I was doing everything right. She had her big house in the fancy neighborhood with the gate, and I was like ‘why do you want to leave this to go live some hobo life?’”

“It’s a tiny space. You have to be efficient with function and you have to be efficient with design. It’s kind of fun.”


Connect with Josh:

Making Geeks Podcast

Facebook

Instagram

YouTube

Marsh Wildman

MarshMarsh Wildman is the founder of Wildman Tech, a fabrication shop in Sacramento that helps artists integrate technology into their work. A solid educational foundation in the industrial arts helped Marsh to explore his creativity in a wide variety of jobs spanning all aspects of making, including a YouTube channel. Our conversation with Marsh covers many areas of his colorful life, so join us as we talk to Marsh about:

  • The foundational role of industrial arts education in his life
  • Hacking on bicycles as a child
  • The growth of the new Industrial Arts via the Maker movement and Makerspaces
  • His time in the army

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“We had the most awesome industrial arts program there. They had a complete woodshop, a complete metal shop including a foundry, sheet metal, welding, then they had an electronics shop and a drafting shop. You were there for six semesters, and in the six semesters you would go through the four aspects of industrial arts.”

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“My friends and I, we were always tinkering with stuff. We had the electronics semester in the industrial arts program in junior high, and that took us towards HAM radio, and electronics, computers were pretty new then – we would hang out at the Radio Shack and there were people there who were building computers from scratch!”

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“The Maker community is very supportive of one another. A very helpful group. You know, I’ve reached out to some pretty notable names in the Maker and machinist online communities with questions of various kinds, and these folks have no problem writing you back and engaging in conversation, they’ll give you the benefit of their knowledge and help you out in any way they can.”

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“Most folks’ biggest issue is they don’t know what they don’t know. I know what I don’t know!”

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“Whatever you can conceive and believe, you can achieve, right?”


Connect with Marsh:

Wildman.tech

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter

YouTube

Google+

Instructables

 


Craig Thibodeau

craigWoodworker Craig Thibodeau is a maker of fine furniture and a writer for Fine Woodworking Magazine. His work is known for its incorporation of marquetry and other intricate veneering. A mechanical engineer by trade, Craig started a business that failed before making the jump to woodworking full time — and he’s been doing it ever since. Join us as we talk to Craig about:

  • His early affinity for shop class
  • The disconnect between studying engineering and being an engineer
  • Starting a business with his friends and watching it fall apart
  • Supporting a family through woodworking

“My first engineering job, I didn’t do anything related to what I studied. All the calculus and non-linear mathematics I learned? That was a total waste of time. It’s great to have taken those classes and suffered through all those classes, but I have never used any of it. Couldn’t solve a differential equation now if I had to.”

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“Even with today’s equipment, the mechanical complexity of some of these pieces is astonishing. I’ve seen pictures of them, and still have difficulty understanding how they were able to do that with no CNC, no computer control; no computer drafting programs — just a pencil and a piece of paper.”

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“If you’re not making enough money to pay for insurance, you’re not making enough money. Like, if you’re not making enough money to buy food, you’re not making enough money. You’re not really self-sustaining. You’re not going to be in business for very long. If $100 a month of insurance money is going to make or break the bank account, then you’re either not charging enough or not selling enough.”

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“[School] doesn’t teach you how to be an engineer. It teaches you how to learn, or how to read, and how to study, but it doesn’t necessarily teach you how to be an engineer. Because in the number of engineering jobs that I had, I never used any of the stuff I learned in school.”

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“Maybe it’s good for everybody to do that – to try it and fail at some point. But it can be really expensive, you know, and you lose friends, for a long time, forever. Friends that you’ve had for a long time are no longer friends because business went south.”

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“Without marketing, doesn’t matter how good the product is. Because nobody’s going to know it’s there.”


Connect with Craig:

CT Fine Furniture

Instagram

Facebook


Music: MANUFUTURE by DJ Derk Jickface

Wordsmithery: Bill Livolsi

 

Wes Swain

WesKnown for his nostalgic video game-inspired builds, Wes Swain grew up watching his grandfather work as a gunsmith. Wes learned electronics and technology over a series of jobs, starting with four years as an aviation electronics specialist in the US Navy. These days, Wes is passionate about nerd culture, making things, and fatherhood. His YouTube channel, Geeksmithing, blends ‘80s nostalgia with the complexities of parenting while paying homage to the lessons Wes learned from his grandfather. Wes also cohosts a podcast, Making Geeks, where he discusses his passions with other like-minded makers. Join us as we talk about:

  • Classic video games
  • Experiencing 9/11 onboard an aircraft carrier
  • Finding your way in an oversaturated job market
  • The motivation of having an audience

“Well I have this YouTube space now, and I have this online presence now, it’s motivating me to create things even if I didn’t feel motivated internally, because people were expecting me to make something cool for them”.

 


Connect with Wes:

geeksmithing.com

makinggeeks.com

YouTube

Instagram

FaceBook

Twitter


Music: MANUFUTURE by DJ Derk Jickface

Wordsmithery: Bill Livolsi

 

Cristiana Felgueiras

Cristiana FelgueirasCristiana Felgueiras has a unique view of the world. An artist, musician, and maker from Porto, Portugal, Cristiana started making gifts for her parents and sister when she was still a small child. Early on, she recognized her hands-on approach to learning and the enjoyment she gets from being active, which has transformed itself into her popular YouTube channel, Get Hands Dirty. Join us as we talk to Cristiana about:

  • Never having a “real” job
  • The frustrations of the art world
  • YouTube as an exhibition space / digital gallery
  • The appeal of functional artwork

“I think that you should try to find what makes you feel alive and what really inspires you to be yourself. I know that it’s really hard to know what you want, but I guess that it’s not that difficult to know what you don’t want.”

“I’m making things in a subconscious way that, sometimes I kind of wake up and realize that I’m here. And I don’t really know where I want to go, but I know that I’m in the right path.”

“Being active is my air, you know? I can only breathe and be good with myself in life if I’m active.”


Connect with Cris:


Have you seen what we have cooking?
FBMakerCastGAW


Music: MANUFUTURE by DJ Derk Jickface

Wordsmithery: Bill Livolsi

Carl Jacobson

Carl Jacobson Jelly

A woodworker for most of his life, Carl Jacobson is best known for his unusual and unique woodturning projects. As part of the YouTube Maker community, Carl says that his channel encourages him to try new things and stretch beyond his comfort zone. Carl’s experience with YouTube has led him to venture into education, and he plans to release a series of woodturning DVDs for some of his more popular and intricate projects. Join us as we talk to Carl about:

Experiments turning unusual materials, including automotive paint build-up

The joy of figuring things out for yourself / not following instructions

Intentionally leaving mistakes in his videos

“I don’t know how else to say it but I hate sitting in a classroom. I hate sitting there and having something explained to me. I would much rather, no matter what it is, just get up and do it.”


carl “Whatever you enjoy making, do that. Don’t try and fit in or do something that you don’t enjoy because it might be popular or something, because it’s going to show.”


“People who buy things out of galleries, they’re actually more interested in the story. As far as going into Walmart and buying something — it’s not why they’re there. They’re there because they appreciate well made handmade things and they want to get to know the person that made it. That’s more important to them than the physical piece. They might love the piece, but if it’s number 18 of 1,000,000, it’s not the same.


Carl’s video on the jellyfish!


Connect with Carl:

YouTube

thewoodshop.tv

Facebook

Instagram


Have you seen what we have cooking?
FBMakerCastGAW


maerch


Music: MANUFUTURE by DJ Derk Jickface

Wordsmithery: Bill Livolsi

Tim Sway

TimSway

Tim Sway is a man of many talents. As a YouTube maker, upcyclist, musician, and host on the Reclaimed Audio Podcast, Tim calls himself a “professional child” who aims to make worthless things into priceless art with a purpose. Tim’s long-term ambition is to use his work not only to inspire others to make things, but also to consider their habits and make a positive impact on the planet as a whole. Join us as we talk to Tim about:

The definition of work
The positive value of change
How flexibility can change your entire life
Working with your kids and the genesis of Vance Maker


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“I am a proponent of change. I believe that change is almost always good. Even when bad things happen, change leads towards something better. And I realized that the way I was living needed change — that this was not gonna be a good life.”

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Neck


Connect with Tim:

timsway.net

ReclaimedAudioPodcast.com (with Bill Lutes and Phil Pinsky)

YouTube

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter


Have you seen what we have cooking?
FBMakerCastGAW


Music: MANUFUTURE by DJ Derk Jickface

Wordsmithery: Bill Livolsi

Jared Hildabrant

 

DocJared Hildabrant is an electrician by day and a Maker by night. Growing up in a tight-knit blue-collar community, Jared remembers a world where every home had a small workshop out of necessity. He became an electrician only after trying several other jobs and finding they didn’t feel right. Jared used these experiences to guide him toward a career in a skilled trade that provides satisfaction and a solid footing on which he could start a family. Join us as we talk to Jared about:

  • The value of taking things apart
  • Exposing your children to making
  • Seeing college as a means of escape
  • Taking good lessons from bad experiences

“I remember a couple holidays, maybe Christmas Eve, just standing there hitting that button thinking ‘You know, I’m too smart for this. I should be able to figure something out beyond this. This can’t be what I have going on.”


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Connect with Jared:

write2jared (at) gmail (dot) com

Facebook

Instagram

 

Music: MANUFUTURE by DJ Derk Jickface

Wordsmithery: Bill Livolsi

Sarah Cooley

SarahCGrowing up in New York, Sarah Cooley found her entrepreneurial spirit out of nowhere. Sarah is the founder and CEO of Simply Curated, a maker of boutique hand-poured soy candles in elegant glass containers modeled on vintage barware. After a career in design and marketing, Sarah found that she missed working with physical products — and from this, a candle company was born. Sarah is also the creator and host of the From Maker To Manufacturing podcast. Sarah’s podcast is about what it really takes to grow a handmade business, getting into the details about the nuts and bolts of really scaling a business and how you can navigate the growth successfully.

Join us as we talk to Sarah about:

  • The importance of customer feedback
  • Adapting to the market when ideas come into conflict with reality
  • The perks and pitfalls of wholesaling
  • Responsibilities beyond the sale


It’s very easy to do that and it’s very easy to get deceived into thinking you’re making a profit when you’re not. Just because there’s cash in the bank account doesn’t mean you’re making a profit.


Don’t miss out! Sarah was nice enough to offer 20% off your purchase by using the PROMO CODE “makercast” at checkout!


Connect with Sarah:

simplycurated.com

frommakertomanufacturing.com

Pinterest

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter

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Music: MANUFUTURE by DJ Derk Jickface

Wordsmithery: Bill Livolsi